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Posts Tagged ‘Tanzania’

By Jess Broughton

With a running start to the new year WMI has introduced a new girls group to Tanzania. Accepting school aged girls from 10 to 15, this after school group is a great opportunity for girls from different areas to meet and get in-depth and fun education on entrepreneurship, leadership and health. With an overarching goal of readying these young ladies for a healthy and successful future, the immediate aim is to provide a safe and relaxed environment to tackle important topics.

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The teacher, Christina, sits with the girls to answer questions after class

The group’s first day proved its immediate popularity when an anticipated 25 turned into 30 attendants followed by more girls approaching WMI staff with hopes to join. The girls gathered at Tloma Primary school from Tloma, Aya-Labe, Sumawe and Gongali villages and were provided with notebooks and pens before the start of an informative session on HIV/AIDS. Such an important topic for these young ladies was best taught in this group environment in which they could be open and comfortable to communicate and answer questions without any gender influence.

Following a detailed lesson on the topic the teacher separated the girls into small groups in which they were able to discuss questions together more thoroughly and thoughtfully. This was a great opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and to become more comfortable talking to their peers about such a serious topic. The groups were left with questions to answer, given time and then asked to present their answers to the other groups.

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Students eagerly raise their hands to answer the question.

To finish a successful first day of the new club the girls were provided with a football and encouraged to play outdoors together, relax and bond further as a group after some intense work. With weekly sessions planned, more group activities and after session games these girls now have a great source of additional education.

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The Ganako Women’s Community Organization, one of WMI’s partners,  reaches 250 women in five villages in northern Tanzania. GWOCO keeps an office in only one of the villages. But in reality, the entire communities serve as their offices. When visiting other villages, the staff often relies on schools and village governments to lend meeting spaces, but that doesn’t always work out.

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Martha, the GWOCO secretary (left), counts a loan repayment in a forest clearing in Sumawe Village. 

 

 

A few weeks ago the staff arrived at Gongali Primary School to fill out loan applications for 35 borrowers. The teacher told the women they would have to wait a few minutes for a classroom to be available. But the borrowers wanted to get right to it, so they sat down in the grass and started work right there until the classroom was free.

On a recent trip to Sumawe to collect a loan installment, the staff and borrowers found themselves locked out of the village office that they usually use. The borrowers confidently led the staff around to a forest clearing behind the office, and held the entire meeting there. A few coins were briefly lost among the leaves, but they were recovered and the rest of the meeting went off without a hitch.

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Even GWOCO’s official office is fully integrated into the community. A new friend wandered into the office one day during work and had to be herded out. 

WMI’s partners don’t always work under ideal conditions, but they do always get their work done. Whether in their own office, a borrowed classroom, or a forest floor, the ladies of WMI are ambitious and determined. We are proud are team is able to be so adaptable and impactful in the community!

 

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Jess Littman, currently working to create economic and development opportunities for women in rural Tanzania as the 2016 GWOCO Fellow, shares how her experience extends far beyond her work into the heart of the community. 

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Levina’s oldest grandchild, Ima, feeds a piece of cake to Kim.

 

Working in a Tanzanian village is never just about work: everyone here is part of the community. As the WMI Fellow for almost a year now, I have been welcomed into village life far beyond the office.

Recently Levina, the Treasurer of WMI’s local partner organization in Tanzania, celebrated the confirmation of her daughter, Venosta, and a young girl, Katie, whose care and support she has taken on as part of her community leadership.

Levina hosted a mass in her backyard in a tent overflowing with friends and family. In addition to prayer and a sermon, we sang songs and danced in celebration. Venosta and Katie wore bright colored dresses and glitter in their hair, and received gifts from their loved ones.

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Leonila (left), chairwoman of one of the loan groups, dances with the choir.

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