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Posts Tagged ‘east africa’

My name is Paddy Mukasa, and I am a Junior at the University of Strathclyde Glasgow, studying BA Honours Business in Accounting. I am a member of the Strathclyde Harriers (Cross country) team.  Originally, I am from a small town of Katosi, Mukono district in Uganda.paddy-mukasa-photo.png

During my freshman year, I undertook an internship at Crystal Water Solutions, a Malawian start-up. This company was founded by students of the African Business Institute, which kindly matched me to this internship. As this was a new organization, my main responsibility was establishing the book-keeping systems, which involved recording the daily financial transactions of the company in a way that allowed efficient record tracking.  The internship was a great experience because it provided me with entrepreneurial skills and improved my interpersonal skills, while also helping me to apply my classroom knowledge to a real-world business environment, which was a great milestone for me, both professionally and academically.

I am excited to be interning at Women’s Microfinance Initiative (WMI) in Buyobo – Uganda, for the months of July and August! Thus far, I have completed business case studies and have worked closely with borrowers to brainstorm ways that they can improve their business practices. Additionally, I have demonstrated to borrowers how to track their finances so they can maximize income and re-invest in their businesses, and I am currently analysing the savings habits of our borrowers.

I am passionate about the impact of microfinance in my country, and it is my goal to return to Uganda to make a difference in this field after I finish my university studies. This is an amazing opportunity for me to learn the intricacies of microfinance lending in rural areas, and about the daily activities of the women who benefit from the WMI loan program.

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My name is Will Kuenster, and I have just arrived in Buyobo for my two-month stint as a WMI intern. I am originally from St. Paul, Minnesota, so the weather in Buyobo has been a welcome reprieve from the cold and snow!

I graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in December with degrees in Finance and Risk Management. During my senior year in Madison, I was a volunteer intern with Wisconsin Microfinance, which operates small loan hubs in both Haiti and the Phillipines. Through this experience, I came into contact with Robyn and found my inspiration to make the journey to Uganda. Upon returning to the states, I will be starting a job with Deloitte as a Management Consultant in Minneapolis.

During my time in Buyobo, I will be conducting a series of case studies on the successful businesses built by our borrowers, ranging from Pharmacies to Schools to Tailoring Shops. The goal of the studies is to gain an in-depth understanding of their day-to-day operations and see how their businesses fit into and impact their daily lives. Our secondary goal, if possible, is to work alongside the borrowers to brainstorm and implement new ideas to help the businesses improve and grow.

I look forward to sharing the stories of these amazing women!

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The saga of our partnership with USAID continues! We held a training of trainers back in March, where members of the USAID came out for a full day training with 6 senior VHT members to give a comprehensive overview of the information in the materials and how to use these materials when doing community outreach.

Below are some photos from the training. The next and final step will be to get the rest of the VHT staff trained which will happen in the next couple of months. February, March and April are digging, planting and harvesting season for beans and maiz (this actually gets harvested in June/July) so everyone is busy in their gardens and is not able to take a day away from this to come to a training, which we understand 🙂 In order to be successful we have to be respectful (of people, their time, culture and priorities)!

Enjoy the photos and head to our instagram @wmionline to see a video! Stay tuned for our blog on the training of the rest of our VHT members!

 

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VHT Members with the USAID trainers!

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VHT Members, USAID Trainers and our fellow celebrating a successful training 🙂

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Many innovations in clean energy, including biogas, have demonstrated incredible applicability and success within communities here in Eastern Uganda. We have begun exploring the feasibility of bringing home biogas solutions to Buyobo and the surrounding villages for the following reasons!

Challenges surrounding today’s energy sources are increasing:

Homes in remote villages rely primarily on burning firewood to power stoves used for cooking. In some cases, homes have supplemental power from solar panels to fuel small lights. However, the environmental and humanitarian impacts of so many homes and villages using firewood are getting increasingly severe.

The challenges with this significant reliance on firewood include:

  • There is a diminishing supply of trees which can be chopped for wood (especially due to the logging companies)
  • Reduced foliage makes the land more susceptible to landslides (especially during the ~5 month rainy season) which have ruined homes, villages, roads, and bridges across the region as well as killing many people in their path
  • Villagers must travel increasingly farther away from their homes to source firewood, creating sometimes dangerous and lengthy treks through unfamiliar forests

Biogas is a potential solution:

In order to reduce the dependence on firewood, one option is for homes and villages to install biogas solutions in their homes. Biogas is fuel that is produced by fermenting organic matter, such as cow dung and household waste (process diagramed below1). Household systems are typically small outdoor structures with pipes that run underground into the home and rely on cow dung as the organic input.

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In order to see biogas in action we visited Namisindwa a village on the other side of the mountain to see how their home systems were working for them! Below are some photos from our visit:

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homeowners put the cow dung here and it will slowly make its way to down to start its change from dung to gas! Surprisingly it doesn’t smell.

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A gas nozzle

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The gas pressure gauge inside a house

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the stove that is powered by biogas!

 

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A training school has also installed a biogas system to power their kitchen. They use a mix of human and cow waste

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One of two cookstoves in the kitchen of the training school which feeds 300 students everyday

There are several international organizations involved in bringing biogas technology to Uganda. To learn more about these efforts, called the “Uganda Domestic Biogas Programme (UDBP),” please visit www.heifer.org and www.africabiogas.org.

 

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Hi everyone,

Our newest interns arrived at the beginning of June and will be here for 2 months working on data entry, teaching english games to the teachers and students of Buyobo nursery school, working with a small group of orphans for a pilot run of a potential new outreach project and interviewing borrowers!

Without further adue please let me introduce Lilia and Cerina!

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Hi! My name is Lilia, I’m 21 years old (as of yesterday!), and I’m from the great city of Boston, Massachusetts, USA. I love to learn languages, meet new people, sing and play music, and travel whenever I have the chance. I am passionate about children’s rights issues and community development, and hope to have a long career making the lives of kids and families around the world a little bit better. Currently, I am entering my second year at Leiden University in The Hague, Netherlands. I study International Studies with a concentration in Africa and the Swahili language. In my course of study, I’ve had the chance to learn about the languages, cultures, history, and politics of many places in Africa, but I wanted to experience East Africa from a more personal, “boots on the ground” perspective. Studying in an international university in such a diverse and multinational city as the Hague has exposed me to new friendships and relationships with people from all around the world, which motivated me even more to seek knowledge and experiences of the places my friends call home.

In my future career, I plan to work in international development and human rights law in Africa, so I wanted to gain some experience and perspective on the issues facing vulnerable communities here. I knew that the socioeconomic situation in Uganda is particularly harsh in rural villages, so when I found out about the work that WMI is doing to empower rural women and their communities here, I knew I wanted the chance to be involved. I reached out and applied, and I couldn’t be happier with my decision to join WMI as a summer intern! I am especially enjoying the work we are doing with the orphan outreach program, as supporting the development and wellbeing of vulnerable children is something near to my heart. I am loving my time here in Uganda, and I couldn’t have asked for a better opportunity to learn, experience new things, and be a part of the incredible impact that WMI is making throughout Uganda and East Africa!

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Hey my name is Cerina! I am 19 years old, and come from Auckland, New Zealand. One year ago, I packed up my stuff, said goodbye to my family and friends and moved to the U.S to study Economics at Princeton University. I hope to initially find a job in the financial sector, and then transition into a career that more closely mirrors the work that I have been doing here in Uganda – perhaps as a consultant for a NGO or in working for a development bank. I really like working with numbers, and analyzing data, so am pretty set in finding a job in the business sphere.

 I love to travel, and I especially enjoy exploring new cities, so living one hour away from NYC was one of the highlights of my freshman year. Coming to Africa was a tick of my bucket list, as I have always wanted to visit, but could never quite convince my parents to book a family vacation here as opposed to our regular holiday spot in Australia. I have only been in Uganda for two weeks and already know that it holds a soft spot in my heart. It is a beautiful country, and I have been humbled by the mountains that surround Buyobo and Mbale, and by the beauty of the Nile River. Everybody here in Buyobo has been so welcoming and kind, which has made staying in Buyobo a true pleasure. I am looking forward to seeing more of what Uganda has to offer, and working closely with the community of Buyobo for my remaining month and a half here.

 

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