Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘community development’

Many innovations in clean energy, including biogas, have demonstrated incredible applicability and success within communities here in Eastern Uganda. We have begun exploring the feasibility of bringing home biogas solutions to Buyobo and the surrounding villages for the following reasons!

Challenges surrounding today’s energy sources are increasing:

Homes in remote villages rely primarily on burning firewood to power stoves used for cooking. In some cases, homes have supplemental power from solar panels to fuel small lights. However, the environmental and humanitarian impacts of so many homes and villages using firewood are getting increasingly severe.

The challenges with this significant reliance on firewood include:

  • There is a diminishing supply of trees which can be chopped for wood (especially due to the logging companies)
  • Reduced foliage makes the land more susceptible to landslides (especially during the ~5 month rainy season) which have ruined homes, villages, roads, and bridges across the region as well as killing many people in their path
  • Villagers must travel increasingly farther away from their homes to source firewood, creating sometimes dangerous and lengthy treks through unfamiliar forests

Biogas is a potential solution:

In order to reduce the dependence on firewood, one option is for homes and villages to install biogas solutions in their homes. Biogas is fuel that is produced by fermenting organic matter, such as cow dung and household waste (process diagramed below1). Household systems are typically small outdoor structures with pipes that run underground into the home and rely on cow dung as the organic input.

biogasblog

In order to see biogas in action we visited Namisindwa a village on the other side of the mountain to see how their home systems were working for them! Below are some photos from our visit:

IMG_6697

homeowners put the cow dung here and it will slowly make its way to down to start its change from dung to gas! Surprisingly it doesn’t smell.

IMG_6693

A gas nozzle

IMG_6695

The gas pressure gauge inside a house

IMG_6694

the stove that is powered by biogas!

 

IMG_6709

A training school has also installed a biogas system to power their kitchen. They use a mix of human and cow waste

IMG_6711

One of two cookstoves in the kitchen of the training school which feeds 300 students everyday

There are several international organizations involved in bringing biogas technology to Uganda. To learn more about these efforts, called the “Uganda Domestic Biogas Programme (UDBP),” please visit www.heifer.org and www.africabiogas.org.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Hi everyone,

Our newest interns arrived at the beginning of June and will be here for 2 months working on data entry, teaching english games to the teachers and students of Buyobo nursery school, working with a small group of orphans for a pilot run of a potential new outreach project and interviewing borrowers!

Without further adue please let me introduce Lilia and Cerina!

IMG_6982

Hi! My name is Lilia, I’m 21 years old (as of yesterday!), and I’m from the great city of Boston, Massachusetts, USA. I love to learn languages, meet new people, sing and play music, and travel whenever I have the chance. I am passionate about children’s rights issues and community development, and hope to have a long career making the lives of kids and families around the world a little bit better. Currently, I am entering my second year at Leiden University in The Hague, Netherlands. I study International Studies with a concentration in Africa and the Swahili language. In my course of study, I’ve had the chance to learn about the languages, cultures, history, and politics of many places in Africa, but I wanted to experience East Africa from a more personal, “boots on the ground” perspective. Studying in an international university in such a diverse and multinational city as the Hague has exposed me to new friendships and relationships with people from all around the world, which motivated me even more to seek knowledge and experiences of the places my friends call home.

In my future career, I plan to work in international development and human rights law in Africa, so I wanted to gain some experience and perspective on the issues facing vulnerable communities here. I knew that the socioeconomic situation in Uganda is particularly harsh in rural villages, so when I found out about the work that WMI is doing to empower rural women and their communities here, I knew I wanted the chance to be involved. I reached out and applied, and I couldn’t be happier with my decision to join WMI as a summer intern! I am especially enjoying the work we are doing with the orphan outreach program, as supporting the development and wellbeing of vulnerable children is something near to my heart. I am loving my time here in Uganda, and I couldn’t have asked for a better opportunity to learn, experience new things, and be a part of the incredible impact that WMI is making throughout Uganda and East Africa!

Attachment-1

Hey my name is Cerina! I am 19 years old, and come from Auckland, New Zealand. One year ago, I packed up my stuff, said goodbye to my family and friends and moved to the U.S to study Economics at Princeton University. I hope to initially find a job in the financial sector, and then transition into a career that more closely mirrors the work that I have been doing here in Uganda – perhaps as a consultant for a NGO or in working for a development bank. I really like working with numbers, and analyzing data, so am pretty set in finding a job in the business sphere.

 I love to travel, and I especially enjoy exploring new cities, so living one hour away from NYC was one of the highlights of my freshman year. Coming to Africa was a tick of my bucket list, as I have always wanted to visit, but could never quite convince my parents to book a family vacation here as opposed to our regular holiday spot in Australia. I have only been in Uganda for two weeks and already know that it holds a soft spot in my heart. It is a beautiful country, and I have been humbled by the mountains that surround Buyobo and Mbale, and by the beauty of the Nile River. Everybody here in Buyobo has been so welcoming and kind, which has made staying in Buyobo a true pleasure. I am looking forward to seeing more of what Uganda has to offer, and working closely with the community of Buyobo for my remaining month and a half here.

 

Read Full Post »

Recently I had the opportunity to sit with 12 of our lead coordinators to talk about budgeting, savings, and personal financial planning. Often, budgeting isn’t the most fun topic (especially when we realize how many different expenses we have!) but the BWA women excitedly and actively participated in the discussion.

marissablog1

During the session, we reviewed the importance of:

  • Setting short and long-term goals; giving us a framework to envision how the money we make and spend today impacts our future
  • Creating a personal financial picture; equipping the women with the ability to understand the “lay of the land” when it comes to their personal finances
  • Establishing strategies to proactively manage expenses; developing plans to save regularly, including tactics to reduce extraneous spending to achieve goals more quickly

marissablog3

The value of recording your inflows and outflows of money was one of the biggest takeaways from our discussion. Each woman had multiple sources of income that they received at varying times per year, ranging from their salaries as teachers to their multiple yearly harvests from their garden.

marissablog2

And naturally, each had multiple different types of expenses occurring throughout the year. The “simple” practice of writing down these various income sources and expenses was eye opening for many of the women – as it is for so many people. By only keeping this crucial personal finance information in our heads we can often misestimate our financial situation and as they say here “eat money without realizing where it is going.”

marissablog4

After two hours of discussion about goal setting, savings management, and personal financial planning the lead coordinators now have an outline to share and will continue to use this template as a training tool for current and future borrowers. Small steps and encouragement towards active management of their personal budget will help empower each woman to be confident in their financial situation and achieve the goals they set for themselves. It was a pleasure starting this dialogue with the coordinators and demonstrating the power of budgeting!

marissablog5

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

By Jess Broughton

With a running start to the new year WMI has introduced a new girls group to Tanzania. Accepting school aged girls from 10 to 15, this after school group is a great opportunity for girls from different areas to meet and get in-depth and fun education on entrepreneurship, leadership and health. With an overarching goal of readying these young ladies for a healthy and successful future, the immediate aim is to provide a safe and relaxed environment to tackle important topics.

unnamed

The teacher, Christina, sits with the girls to answer questions after class

The group’s first day proved its immediate popularity when an anticipated 25 turned into 30 attendants followed by more girls approaching WMI staff with hopes to join. The girls gathered at Tloma Primary school from Tloma, Aya-Labe, Sumawe and Gongali villages and were provided with notebooks and pens before the start of an informative session on HIV/AIDS. Such an important topic for these young ladies was best taught in this group environment in which they could be open and comfortable to communicate and answer questions without any gender influence.

Following a detailed lesson on the topic the teacher separated the girls into small groups in which they were able to discuss questions together more thoroughly and thoughtfully. This was a great opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and to become more comfortable talking to their peers about such a serious topic. The groups were left with questions to answer, given time and then asked to present their answers to the other groups.

img_3716

Students eagerly raise their hands to answer the question.

To finish a successful first day of the new club the girls were provided with a football and encouraged to play outdoors together, relax and bond further as a group after some intense work. With weekly sessions planned, more group activities and after session games these girls now have a great source of additional education.

Read Full Post »

The Ganako Women’s Community Organization, one of WMI’s partners,  reaches 250 women in five villages in northern Tanzania. GWOCO keeps an office in only one of the villages. But in reality, the entire communities serve as their offices. When visiting other villages, the staff often relies on schools and village governments to lend meeting spaces, but that doesn’t always work out.

img_1793

Martha, the GWOCO secretary (left), counts a loan repayment in a forest clearing in Sumawe Village. 

 

 

A few weeks ago the staff arrived at Gongali Primary School to fill out loan applications for 35 borrowers. The teacher told the women they would have to wait a few minutes for a classroom to be available. But the borrowers wanted to get right to it, so they sat down in the grass and started work right there until the classroom was free.

On a recent trip to Sumawe to collect a loan installment, the staff and borrowers found themselves locked out of the village office that they usually use. The borrowers confidently led the staff around to a forest clearing behind the office, and held the entire meeting there. A few coins were briefly lost among the leaves, but they were recovered and the rest of the meeting went off without a hitch.

img_8156

Even GWOCO’s official office is fully integrated into the community. A new friend wandered into the office one day during work and had to be herded out. 

WMI’s partners don’t always work under ideal conditions, but they do always get their work done. Whether in their own office, a borrowed classroom, or a forest floor, the ladies of WMI are ambitious and determined. We are proud are team is able to be so adaptable and impactful in the community!

 

Read Full Post »

Jess Littman, currently working to create economic and development opportunities for women in rural Tanzania as the 2016 GWOCO Fellow, shares how her experience extends far beyond her work into the heart of the community. 

img_1612

Levina’s oldest grandchild, Ima, feeds a piece of cake to Kim.

 

Working in a Tanzanian village is never just about work: everyone here is part of the community. As the WMI Fellow for almost a year now, I have been welcomed into village life far beyond the office.

Recently Levina, the Treasurer of WMI’s local partner organization in Tanzania, celebrated the confirmation of her daughter, Venosta, and a young girl, Katie, whose care and support she has taken on as part of her community leadership.

Levina hosted a mass in her backyard in a tent overflowing with friends and family. In addition to prayer and a sermon, we sang songs and danced in celebration. Venosta and Katie wore bright colored dresses and glitter in their hair, and received gifts from their loved ones.

img_1589

Leonila (left), chairwoman of one of the loan groups, dances with the choir.

(more…)

Read Full Post »